Why I Love Being a Radio Host

By Francine Silverman

I am in the driver’s seat as a radio host. I can ask any questions I want of the guest, speak to some of the most interesting people on earth and never know when the guest will surprise me with good news, such as placing the audio on her website (that happened) to offering syndication (it should only happen).

Trying to get hosts to send back my questionnaires for my ebooks is much harder than getting guests on my show. When I pitched for guests on Radio Guest List the floodgates opened with hundreds of requests to be on my show. They didn’t even know where the show aired! I was never so busy fielding responses. Imagine if I was Sean Hannity or Geraldo Rivera? When I started Fraternizing with Fran, my producer said he’d like to be my co-host and it’s working out beautifully. Where once I feared silences or lack of questions when there’s a lull he pops up with his questions. The half hour flies by.

I would love to hear from other hosts and what they like about being behind the microphone.

Be Entertaining

By Francine Silverman

I was recently a guest on an hour-long show and I was tired. I had exercised in the morning, did my own radio show, and had to be “up” for my interview. It was a struggle and I felt terrible about it, although the host assured me it was a good show. She’s sweet that way.

As Kimberly Henrie wrote in her article for About.com,

11 Dos and Don’ts for Getting Free Radio Promotion

Remember that radio is entertainment. If you land an interview be prepared to entertain the audience in addition to informing them. Be over-friendly, over-excited, wildly outrageous, flirtatious, funny, morbid, something that the audience won’t expect. And do it in a big way. You have to overdo in radio for the emotion to get across the airwaves. A guest who says they will be entertaining, and doesn’t deliver is a big disappointment for a show host/producer.

She continues:
Become a frequent caller to your local radio show. Call in with jokes, funny stories, Christmas shopping ideas, road conditions, whatever. As long as you are witty and entertaining, the show’s host will probably keep putting you on the air. If you add something to his/her show, he/she will love you for it and be more likely to let you plug your business or occasion.

Did you know that Sean Hannity got his start in radio by constantly calling radio shows and giving his two cents?. Turned out the other listeners liked him more than the hosts.

Ten Tips for Being a Good Host and Guest

by Francine Silverman

 

For the Host: Do your research on the guests and ask for a copy of their book or information on their business. The more you know about the guest the more insightful your questions will be. Prepare questions beforehand. Even if the guest supplies 10 or 15 questions, they are generally not meaty enough.

 

Listen to your guests’ responses. The answers will often give you more questions to ask. Hosts must be good listeners as well as good talkers. Be certain to contact the guest before the interview. You don’t want to be stuck with a guest forgetting and you holding the bag.

For the Guest: Be passionate about your subject. Most important. There’s nothing worse than a guest who drones on or speaks in a monotone.

Be well-versed about your subject. You were invited on the show because you’re considered an expert on your topic. Don’t disappoint either the host or audience with vague responses. Be well-spoken and friendly. Practice as a radio guest will aid in your ability to let the words flow and help you relax on the air.

So do as many interviews as you can, regardless of the caliber of the show.

Use the host’s name often in your interview. Everyone loves the sound of their name. This will score high points with the host.
Do not over-promote your book or business. Remember, you’re not on the air to promote your product but rather to provide valuable information to listeners. Besides, a good host will be sure to mention the book title, name of your business and your website many times. Send a thank you after the show.Hosts prepare for their shows and appreciate being acknowledged. You cannot imagine how much a simple “thank you” email means to the host.

 

 

Be Entertaining

By Francine Silverman

I was recently a guest on an hour-long show and I was tired. I had exercised in the morning, did my own radio show, and had to be “up” for my interview. It was a struggle and I felt terrible about it, although the host assured me it was a good show. She’s sweet that way.

As Kimberly Henrie wrote in her article for About.com,
11 Dos and Don’ts for Getting Free Radio Promotion

Remember that radio is entertainment. If you land an interview be prepared to entertain the audience in addition to informing them. Be over-friendly, over-excited, wildly outrageous, flirtatious, funny, morbid, something that the audience won’t expect. And do it in a big way. You have to overdo in radio for the emotion to get across the airwaves. A guest who says they will be entertaining, and doesn’t deliver is a big disappointment for a show host/producer.

She continues:
Become a frequent caller to your local radio show. Call in with jokes, funny stories, Christmas shopping ideas, road conditions, whatever. As long as you are witty and entertaining, the show’s host will probably keep putting you on the air. If you add something to his/her show, he/she will love you for it and be more likely to let you plug your business or occasion.

Did you know that Sean Hannity got his start in radio by constantly calling radio shows and giving his two cents. Turned out the other listeners liked him more than the hosts.

Ten Tips for Being a Good Radio Host

For the Host:

(1) Do your research on the guests and ask for a copy of their book or information on their business. The more you know about the guest the more insightful your questions will be.
(2) Prepare questions beforehand. Even if the guest supplies 10 or 15 questions, they are generally not meaty enough.
(3) Listen to your guests’ responses. The answers will often give you more questions to ask. Hosts must be good listeners as well as good talkers.
(4) Be certain to contact the guest before the interview. You don’t want to be stuck with a guest forgetting and you holding the bag.

For the Guest:

(1) Be passionate about your subject. Most important. There’s nothing worse than a guest who drones on or speaks in a monotone.
(2) Be well-versed about your subject. You were invited on the show because you’re considered an expert on your topic. Don’t disappoint either the host or audience with vague responses.
(3) Be well-spoken and friendly. Practice as a radio guest will aid in your ability to let the words flow and help you relax on the air. So do as many interviews as you can, regardless of the caliber of the show.
(4) Use the host’s name often in your interview. Everyone loves the sound of their name. This will score high points with the host.
(5) Do not over-promote your book or business. Remember, you’re not on the air to promote your product but rather to provide valuable information to listeners. Besides, a good host will be sure to mention the book title, name of your business and your website many times.
(4) Send a thank you after the show. Hosts prepare for their shows and appreciate being acknowledged. You cannot imagine how much a simple “thank you” email means to the host.

Ten Tips for Being a Good Host and Guest

by Francine Silverman

For the Host: Do your research on the guests and ask for a copy of their book or information on their business. The more you know about the guest the more insightful your questions will be. Prepare questions beforehand. Even if the guest supplies 10 or 15 questions, they are generally not meaty enough.

Listen to your guests’ responses. The answers will often give you more questions to ask. Hosts must be good listeners as well as good talkers. Be certain to contact the guest before the interview. You don’t want to be stuck with a guest forgetting and you holding the bag.

For the Guest: Be passionate about your subject. Most important. There’s nothing worse than a guest who drones on or speaks in a monotone.

Be well-versed about your subject. You were invited on the show because you’re considered an expert on your topic. Don’t disappoint either the host or audience with vague responses. Be well-spoken and friendly. Practice as a radio guest will aid in your ability to let the words flow and help you relax on the air.

So do as many interviews as you can, regardless of the caliber of the show.

Use the host’s name often in your interview. Everyone loves the sound of their name. This will score high points with the host.
Do not over-promote your book or business. Remember, you’re not on the air to promote your product but rather to provide valuable information to listeners. Besides, a good host will be sure to mention the book title, name of your business and your website many times. Send a thank you after the show.Hosts prepare for their shows and appreciate being acknowledged. You cannot imagine how much a simple “thank you” email means to the host.

What Are the Most Popular Topics on Radio?

By Francine Silverman

As author of Talk Radio Wants You – An Intimate Guide to 700 Shows and How to Get Invited (McFarland & Co. 2009), 16 ebooks of talk radio shows, and an on-line publicist who gets her clients on radio shows, I can tell you that the most popular talk radio shows cover six categories: Business, New Age, Self-Help, Politics, Entertainment, and Health Both my book and ebooks have more shows in those categories than any others, including animals, environment, relationships, food and travel, house and garden, and science and technology. If you are an expert in any of these areas, there is a good chance you can be a guest on radio. Not only are there more shows with those themes, but the more shows the more competition for guests.

I can also tell you that most hosts prefer emails over telephone, and want guests with personality and expertise. After all, radio hosts are in the business of entertainment. If you are comfortable talking on the radio and can give listeners valuable information you are a shoo-in. While authors have a slight advantage over non-authors in getting interviews, there is no reason why non-authors who are experts are not popular guests. In fact, I recently proposed sending bios of some of my authors to a host of an entertainment show and he wrote back that it would be nice to have authors on for a change. He probably is used to interviewing musicians and artists who haven’t written books.

If you want exposure, radio interviews are free and you can do the interview from home in your pajamas. Why not take advantage of this popular medium? Remember – radio hosts NEED guests.

Talk Radio Wants You

This is the last column presenting the terrestrial shows from either my book,Talk Radio Wants You, or one or more of my 16 ebooks of talk radio shows. The categories in parentheses represent the book and/or ebooks where that station is listed. Bear in mind that one show may cover two categories, such as a food show may go into both the health and environment ebooks. Also, don’t be fooled by the limited categories. The station may air many more categories – these only reflect the hosts that responded to my questionnaires.

All that’s left is Wyoming

KGAB, Cheyenne, Wyoming (ebook – health, business, politics)

http://www.kgab.com

Program director Dave Chaffin
davechaffin@townsquaremedia.com

Talk Radio Wants You

In my last column, I presented Utah (on-air) stations that are in my book, Talk Radio Wants You, and in one or more of my 16 ebooks of talk radio shows. The categories in parentheses represent the book and/or ebooks where that station is listed. Bear in mind that one show may cover two categories, such as a food show may go into both the health and environment ebooks. Also, don’t be fooled by the limited categories. The station may air many more categories – these only reflect the hosts that responded to my questionnaire

In this column, I am covering Virginia, Washiington, Washingon, D.C. and Wisconsin:

 

 

 

 

Virginia

 

WLEE, Richmond, Va. (ebook – men & women and politics)

Office Phone: 804-643-0990

 

 

Washingto

KKNW, Bellevue, Wa. (in book – self-help, men & women, New Age, animals and business; in ebooks – self-help, parenting, NewAge, business)

http://1150kknw.com

425-373-5536

 

 

KIXI,  Bellevue, Wa. – (ebook  – food and travel, men & women)

http://kixi.com

Marc Kaye, general manager – marck@kixi.com

 

 

 

KVI, Seattle, Wa – (in book – business; ebook – business)

http://www.kvi.com

COMMENT@KVI.COM

 

 

KIRO, Seattle, Wa. (in book – food and wine)

http://www.mynorthwest.com

http:///wwwkiroradio.com

Program director Larry Gifford – lgifford@bonneville.com

 

 

KPTK, Seattle, Wa. (in book – politics; in ebook – politics).

http://seattle.cbslocal.com

Progressive talk

Program director  – carey.curelop@cbsradio.com

 

 

KSBN, Spokane, Wa (in book  – business, animals, parents and children, antique and collectibles, politics – in ebook- business, politics).

http://www.ksbn.net

Money talk

509-838-4000

 

 

Washington, D.C.

 

WMAL, Washington, D.C. (ebook – business)

http://www.wmal.com

Programming – 202-895-2327

 

 

 

Wisconsin

 

WGTD, Kenosha, Wisc (book – politics, technology, entertainment)

http://www.wgtd.org

Wisconsin Public Radio

General manager David Cole – coled@gtc.edu

 

 

WLIP, Pleasant Prairie, Wisc (ebook – sports)

http://www.wlip.com

262-694-7800

Program director John Perry – jperry@wlip.com

 

 

WIBA, Madison, Wisc. (ebook – politics)

http://www.wiba.com/main.html

Program director Tim Scott – timscott@clearchannel.com

 

 

WTDY, Madison, Wisc (book – entertainment)

http://www.wtdy.com

Program director Kurt Baron – kurt@wtdy.com

 

Talk Radio Wants You

In my last column, I presented Utah stations that are in my book, Talk Radio Wants You, or from one or more of my 16 ebooks of talk radio shows. The categories in parentheses represent the book and/or ebooks where that station is listed. Bear in mind that one show may cover two categories, such as a food show may go into both the health and environment ebooks. Also, don’t be fooled by the limited categories. The station may air many more categories – these only reflect the hosts that responded to my questionnaires.

In this column, I am covering Virginia, Washiington, Washingon, D.C. and Wisconain

Virginia

WLEE, Richmond, Va. (ebook – men & women and politics)
Office Phone: 804-643-0990

Washington

KKNW, Bellevue, Wa. (in book – self-help, men & women, New Age, animals and business; in ebooks – self-help, parenting, NewAge, business)

http://1150kknw.com

425-373-5536

KIXI, Bellevue, Wa. – (ebook – food and travel, men & women)

http://kixi.com

Marc Kaye, general manager – marck@kixi.com

KVI, Seattle, Wa – (in book – business; ebook – business)

http://www.kvi.com

COMMENT@KVI.COM

KIRO, Seattle, Wa. (in book – food and wine)

http://www.mynorthwest.com

http:///wwwkiroradio.com

Program director Larry Gifford – lgifford@bonneville.com

KPTK, Seattle, Wa. (in book – politics; in ebook – politics).

http://seattle.cbslocal.com

Progressive talk
Program director – carey.curelop@cbsradio.com

KSBN, Spokane, Wa (in book – business, animals, parents and children, antique and collectibles, politics – in ebook- business, politics).

http://www.ksbn.net

Money talk
509-838-4000

Washington, D.C.

WMAL, Washington, D.C. (ebook – business)

http://www.wmal.com

Programming – 202-895-2327

Wisconsin

WGTD, Kenosha, Wisc (book – politics, technology, entertainment)

http://www.wgtd.org

Wisconsin Public Radio
General manager David Cole – coled@gtc.edu

WLIP, Pleasant Prairie, Wisc (ebook – sports)

http://www.wlip.com

262-694-7800
Program director John Perry – jperry@wlip.com

WIBA, Madison, Wisc. (ebook – politics)

http://www.wiba.com/main.html

Program director Tim Scott – timscott@clearchannel.com

WTDY, Madison, Wisc (book – entertainment)

http://www.wtdy.com

Program director Kurt Baron – kurt@wtdy.com